Apostles & Prophets

Apostles & Prophets

After His ascension, Jesus began giving precious gifts to his church, as expressions of his grace – apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers (Ephesians 4:7-11).  As we have written elsewhere, these ‘fivefold’ gifts equip the church for its ministry and are essential if the church is to be built-up and to reach unity, maturity and fulness (Ephesians 4:12-13).

But there is a unique and particular pairing between apostles and prophets: they are foundations upon which the church is built (Ephesians 2:20), being distinguished from the other gifts by their particular revelation (Ephesians 3:5), hence we refer to them as ‘revelatory gifts’.  The Chief Apostle and Prophet continues to manifest himself by giving apostles and prophets to his Body.  

This downloadable paper considers the role and function of these important foundational ministries and the context in which they might function most fruitfully. It includes a range of questions that eldership and leadership teams may find helpful in evaluating their own relationships with apostles and prophets.

Ministry Recognition: What should we be looking for?

Ministry Recognition: What should we be looking for?

Ephesians chapter 4 makes clear to us that the ‘fivefold’ ministries of Apostles, Prophets, Evangelists, Pastors and Teachers are Gifts given by the ascended Lord Jesus Christ to His church, and that all of them are essential if the church is to be built-up and to come to unity and maturity; they are vital parts of the church “until” that time (Ephesians 4:11-13).  Jesus is still giving His Gifts to His church.  They are divinely-given,not humanly-appointed.  

If this is so, then it’s essential that the church knows how to recognise the Gifts Jesus is giving to us; we must know how to test and approve authentic ministry (Revelation 2:2).  This will mean listening carefully to the Spirit and the Word, which will never be in conflict – the Holy Spirit won’t ask us to recognise a person who does not fulfil the biblical criteria… 

So, what criteria do we find in the Word to help us test and approve these ministries?  Although more of the New Testament evidence concerns apostles (there is much less information about the other ministries) and most of that concerns Paul (the pre-eminent post-ascension apostle), the Spirit has – of course – given us all we need to make the necessary judgments about each of the gifts, in their various expressions.  The following brief points are by no means exhaustive (other posts explore some of these things in much more detail), but I hope they provide a helpful starting-point… 

The Gifts of Christ

  • These ministries are people: those gifted by Christ, and given to the church – men and women themselves, not just what they do (note that in 1Co 12:28-30 Paul asks “are all” apostles, prophets or teachers? But in relation to the other gifts listed: “do all” work miracles, have gifts of healing, speak in tongues or interpret?)  They are all expressions of God’s grace to His Church (Eph 4:7).
  • They’re given by the Chief Apostle (Heb 3:1), Prophet (Mt 13:57, 21:11, Lk 13:33), Evangelist (Lk 4:18-19, 19:10), Shepherd (Jn 10:11, Heb 13:20, 1Pe 5:4) and Teacher (Mt 23:10) and each is an aspect (portion) of Christ’s own nature and ministry.  Each is needed (in its many expressions) for the church to have as full a measure of Christ as possible (Eph 4:7).
  • All five are essential for the church to come to maturity and fullness (Eph 4:12f); their shared focus and task is “to equip his people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up” (4:12). They exercise their ministry in such a way that the whole church is empowered to exercise theirs.  An absence of any of them will mean a lack in the church.
  • This equipping will continue “until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ” (4:13) – when He returns. 
  • There are different types and measures of each Gift; all apostles are not all the same; neither prophets, evangelists, pastors or teachers.  Their differences are ordained by God (cf. 1Co 12:18).  Therefore we may not see all of the following characteristics in each of the ministries. We expect to see different “measures” of faith (Ro 12:3) and grace-gift (Ro 12:6, Eph 4:7, 1Co 15:10). .
  • Gifting may overlap within the same person: Paul and Barnabas were numbered amongst the prophets and teachers (Ac 13:1) before being recognised as apostles (Ac 14:4,14, cf 1Ti 2:7, 2Ti 1:11); Philip was one of the Seven (Ac 6:5) and an evangelist (Ac 21:8), etc.

Apostles

  • Apóstolos – one ‘sent-out’ with a commission and authorisation to represent the Sender.
  • Set apart by the Spirit for ‘the work’, which is wider than the local church (Ac 13:1-2, 14:26).
  • Commissioned, authorised and sent-out by Christ Himself (1Co 1:1, Gal 1:1,15).
  • A deep sense of servanthood (Ro 1:1, 1Co 3:5) and entrustment (1Co 4:1-2, Gal 2:7-8).
  • Devoting time to being with Jesus in prayer and Word (Mk 3:13, Ac 6:1-7).
  • Their commissions will vary – eg: “planting”, “watering” or “building” (1Co 3:5ff); or to a particular people (Gal 2:7-8) – and they may outwork their apostleship through another ‘underlying’ gift (pastor, teacher, etc) (Ac 13:1-2).
  • Grace and authority for founding and building-up churches (Ro 1:5, 1Co 3:10, 2Co 10:8, 13:10, Gal 1:15), which are the “seal” of their ministry (1Co 9:1-2).
  • Functionally “first” (1Co 12:28), the apostle is a ‘foundational’ ministry (Eph 2:20); laying a foundation of Christ-centred doctrine (1Co 3:10, Ac 2:46), based on his revelation (Eph 3:5).
  • Spiritual ‘architects’ (seeing the big picture) and master-builders (1Co 3:10).
  • Functioning as fathers toward churches and their leaders (1Co 4:15, 1Th 2:11).
  • Developing a sphere of ministry and churches under his care (2Co 10:13-17, 11:28).
  • Appoints elders to extend his fatherly care and government in each locality (Ac 14:23, Tit 1:5).
  • Concerned for the practical needs of the poor and needy (Gal 2:10).
  • Working in partnership with churches (Phil 1:5) and fellow-apostles (1Co 3:5ff); he may be a ‘hub’ for a team of ministries working together (Ac 13:13, Ro 16:3, Gal 1:2, 1Th 3:2, etc).
  • Enduring and persevering through hardships and trials (2Co 4:7ff, 6:4ff, 12:12).
  • Motivated by his vision of the Bride; Christ’s fulness in His church (Eph 4:13, Col 1:28f, 2Co 11:2).
  • Equipping the Body to be apostolic (‘sent-out’) (Eph 4:12).

Prophets

  • Prophḗtēs –‘one who proclaims’ or ‘one who predicts’; a ‘proclaimer of a divinely inspired message’.
  • Brings a revelation of what God wants to do or accomplish (Amos 3:7, Nu 12:6, 1Co 14:29-30).
  • Functionally “second” (1Co 12:28), the prophet works alongside the apostle in laying foundations in the churches and carrying foundational revelation (Eph 2:20, 3:5; 2Pe 3:2).
  • Bringing clarity and order; making things plain (1Co 14:25); never brings confusion or disorder (1Co 14:32-33).
  • Their spirits are pure and they will always exalt Christ (1Jn 4:1-2).
  • Strengthening, encouraging and comforting the churches (1Co 14:3, Ac 15:32).
  • Function in plurality, with others prophets in the local church (Ac 13:1, 1Co 14:29).
  • Equipping the Body to be prophetic (Eph 4:12).

Evangelists

  • Euaggelistés – ‘bearer of good tidings’.
  • Proclaims Christ and Kingdom; his message is never man-centred (Ac 8:5, 12).
  • Filled with the Spirit (Ac 6:3 cf. Ac 21:8) and led by the Spirit (Ac 8:26, 29, 39).
  • Seeking signs and wonders to authenticate his message (Ac 8:6, 13).
  • Willing to serve in order to release other ministries (Ac 6:4).
  • Works as part of a team; draws upon the apostle and others to ensure all the foundations are properly laid (Ac 8:12ff).
  • Asks probing questions and takes time to sit alongside unbelievers and explain the gospel to them (Ac 8:30ff).
  • Handles the Scriptures well and shares the gospel with ease (Ac 8:35).
  • Imparts faith to believe and call on the Lord (Ro 10:14-15).
  • Equipping the Body to be evangelistic (Eph 4:12).

Pastors

  • Poimén – shepherd
  • Expressing God’s heart of care and compassion for His people, so that none are like “sheep without shepherds” (Mt 9:36, Mk 6:34).
  • An integral aspect of Eldership (Ac 20:28, 1Pe 5:1-2).
  • Gatekeepers in the church, watching over the flock (Jn 10:2, 1Pe 5:2).
  • Works towards a flock established by the Spirit (Ac 20:28).
  • Having a voice that is heard and recognised by the flock (Jn 10:14).
  • Laying down his life for the sheep (Jn 10:11).
  • Equipping the Body to be pastoral (Eph 4:12).

Teachers

  • Didáskalos – ‘an instructor acknowledged for their mastery in their field; one who teaches concerning the things of God, and the duties of man’.
  • Functionally “third”  (1Co 12:28), the teacher unfolds the apostolic doctrine, with authority (Tit 2:1, 15) and a deep sense of awe and responsibility (Jas 3:1).
  • Reliable, suitably-qualified and entrusted with the apostolic revelation and doctrines (2Ti 2:2).
  • Devoted to sound teaching and refuting error (1Ti 4:13, Tit 2:1).
  • Teaching God’s Word, not secondary sources (2Ti 3:16).
  • Teaching by the Spirit (1Jn 2:27, 5:6).
  • They will never teach for personal gain (cf. 2Pe 2:3).
  • Equipping the Body to handle the Word and teach one another (Eph 4:12).

How blessed we are that Jesus is still giving these Gifts to His church! May we be diligent in our evaluation of ministries and in giving proper recognition as they function and bear fruit amongst us…

Eldership: A Dynamic, Noble Task!

Eldership: A Dynamic, Noble Task!

Any familiarity we may have with the New Testament pictures of elders as overseers and shepherds must not allow us to miss the important details of this “noble task” (1 Timothy 3:1) or to become detached in any way from the dynamic realities of the NT.  This article is written especially for elders and their wives, and for all who aspire to serve the church in this way, and takes a fresh look at some vital aspects of eldership and their implications for you as couples together…

1: Firstly, your “appointment” was or will be by the Spirit (Acts 20:28, where the word is etheto meaning ‘to put, place, lay, set, fix, establish’).  Your eldership – an outcome of your lives and marriages – has been determined (indeed ‘pre-determined’) by God.  It may have come about through the agency of others – affirmed by the Body, preceded by prayers and fasting, confirmed by the laying-on of apostolic hands (Acts 14:23) – but the appointment of every elder was established, fixed, arranged and set by the Spirit!  That’s why we first know in our spirit those to whom we’re shepherds.  That’s why at the end of your tenure you must give an account to a Higher Court (Hebrews 13:17).  From start to finish, every aspect of this “noble work” (1 Timothy 3:1) is spiritual and is to be by the Spirit; elders function in a spiritual realm and dynamic.  The ‘natural’ and the ‘spiritual’ are contradictions (Romans 8:4-8, 1 Corinthians 15:46, Galatians 3:3, Jude 1:19), and only spiritual leadership befits God’s House (Ephesians 2:22, 1Peter 2:5).  Our natural leadership will never be enough, and will usually contradict God’s thoughts and plans!  Elders must see and observe spiritually, think spiritually, make spiritual choices, selections and judgments (1 Samuel 16:7, 2 Corinthians 5:16, James 2:4)…

2: Elders are not just as an extension of apostolic government, but of the apostolic heart and mind – appointed by apostles (Acts 14:23) or their delegates (Titus 1:5) to lead the church in its ‘apostolic’ life and mission: being sent into all the world to make disciples (Matthew 28:18f).  Elderships must not stop at seeing the flock well fed, well cared for and well physically; the goal must be healthy people mobilised for the mission.  Therefore, elders will will turn the Body outwards; they will see beyond their locality and serve a greater, wider purpose – releasing people and resources to serve the apostolic vision (cf. Acts 16:1-3).

3: Eldership is a precious stewardship – “managing” or “taking care of God’s household/church” (1 Timothy 3:5).   Elders are to “guard” themselves and the flock (Acts 20:28), which requires that they first guard their own hearts and lives (Proverbs 4:23), then guard one other to save any of us from falling or causing division (Acts 20:30), and then guard the church, which is God’s flock entrusted to us (Acts 20:28, 1 Peter 5:3) – never ours.  Elders are appointed by God’s Spirit for God’s people (Acts 14:23); they serve the flock, never the other way round and their ministry is on behalf of the Chief Shepherd, who alone will reward them for a job well done (1 Peter 5:4).  However, whilst elders will be very close and connected with the church, very personal and available, their time and priorities will be dominated by the demands from ‘above’ not ‘below’.  Elders are not ultimately answerable to those they serve and they cannot allow themselves to be distracted, diverted or diluted.  Likewise, they ought to be unaffected by human praise (or criticism); what matters is the Master’s feedback! 

4: A particular aspect of this will be the eldership’s care and guarding of God’s Word.  As today, the issue in Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:3-4) and Crete (Titus 1:10-11) was false doctrine which threatened to derail the advance of the gospel – and the primary weapon against it was the appointment of elders “able to teach” (1 Timothy 3:2) and “encourage others by sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it” (Titus 1:9).  The antidote to false doctrine was and is elderships embodying sound doctrine.  Elders cannot ‘contract-out’ their study of Scripture or their awareness of what’s being falsely taught in the church or the world.  Not all elders will have primary responsibility for preaching and teaching (1 Timothy 5:17), but all must be competent in handling God’s Word.  This is at the heart of an elder’s’ ‘work’ and ‘craft’, and they must take time to become more proficient in it: to go deeper, dig-down, see and understand more… 

5: Elders function as part of a team.  The NT picture is exclusively one of ‘plurality’ and teamwork (eg, see Acts 11:30, 14:23, 15:2, 20:17, 21:18, 1 Timothy 4:14, Titus 1:5, James 5:14, 1 Peter 5:1); the elders are always seen together, never alone – indeed, they cannot function effectively alone.  Their togetherness is an integral part of God’s ‘setting-in’ and must give rise to vital attributes: they’re never divisive or divide-able, always honouring, and appreciating on another.  They embrace differences in their respective gifts and measures, but esteem their equality as elders.  They need each other – for encouragement, correction, confidence-building, provocation security, common sense, perspective….  And the dynamics of their teamwork must go further, for they also work in harmony with the fivefold Gifts.  They have different concerns (the eldership for the health of the flock; the Gifts for the equipping and maturing of the Body) – but these belong together!  And since the fulness of the church depends on the input and deposit of the Gifts (Ephesians 4:11ff.), then to the extent such gifting is not present within an eldership, elders will draw from beyond themselves to ensure the church has all it needs (1 Corinthians 3:21-23 cf. 3 John 1:9-10).

6: Eldership involves powerful impartation!  They may lay their hands on emerging leaders to impart something to them (1 Timothy 4:14) just as they will pray for the sick and see them raised up (Jas 5:13ff).  The laying on of hands is no less essential or “foundational” than repentance, faith or baptisms (Hebrews 6:1-2)!   Impartation demands that the elders are ‘always ready’: to intercede at any time; to draw heavenly realities down to earth (Matthew 16:19, 18:18).  This dynamic of their task may well mean they use fewer words but see greater works – less instruction and more impartation!  And this impartation will be vital to the development of others; elderships must impart something to emerging leaders without fear of being overtaken, eclipsed or surpassed. 

7: Finally, elders are tasked with setting an example for others to follow (1 Peter 5:1-3, Hebrews 13:7) and this must have depth and breadth; not just an example in worship and prayer, but also in friendliness, openness, humility, winsomeness, missionary zeal; an example – in every respect – of those appointed by the Spirit according to God’s choice and arrangement…  Their example is to be the very opposite of “lording it over” the church (1 Peter 5:3).  They have authority, but we lead with a ‘light touch’; their authority and example builds-up and never tears-down (cf. 2 Corinthians 10:8, 13:10); it releases, liberates and sets free.  Elders are to be catalysts, not controllers.  And of course they should also set an example in devotion: elders worship and fall down before King Jesus (Revelation 4:10, 5:8, 5:14, 7:11, 11:16, 19:4).  They are in awe of the One they serve and represent; they are in love; with Jesus, they are passionate and zealous and they make no apology!…

This noble” task” is “work” (1 Timothy 3:1); the word is ergon meaning ‘work, task, employment; that which is wrought or made; work that accomplishes something; a deed (action) that carries out (completes) an inner desire (intension, purpose)’.  It is often hard work, but it is work alongside friends, by which something is built and created (cf. Nehemiah 3).  And it is work undertaken in the dynamic of the Holy Spirit, who appoints and enables us to succeed in all we do!

In light of these dynamics, eldership teams may wish to consider: (1) Does your eldership fall short of the New Testament picture in any way(s)? If so, what adjustments are required? (2) How can you increase your impact and impartation? (3) As you develop emerging leaders in your church, what can you give them? (4) What do you dream of creating together?…

Authentic Apostolic Ministry

Authentic Apostolic Ministry

One of the most distinct and significant Pentecostal-Charismatic developments of the last forty years has been the emergence of various groups insisting upon the validity of present-day apostolic ministry. Such claims are not without historic precedence, but the present movement has gained considerable momentum and an increasingly widespread acceptance. With it comes the danger of dilution; a watering-down of vital biblical truths, principles and patterns.

This article links to a thesis (written for my Masters Degree in 2012) concerned with the authenticity of apostolic ministry, in which the investigation is carried out from three perspectives.

1. Firstly, there is a thorough examination of the biblical evidence concerning the nature, functions and hallmarks of apostolic ministry as found in the Gospels, Acts and Epistles. Lukan and Pauline concepts of apostleship are compared, Paul’s self-understanding is probed, and a clear picture of authentic apostolic character, tasks and fruit emerges.

2. Secondly, there is a consideration of several ecclesiological matters, including the extent to which notions of ministry in general, and apostleship in particular, are shaped by views of the nature and mission of the church. This is followed by an overview of the historic development of modern concepts of apostolic ecclesiology.

3. The third perspective is a practical one, and here we consider how those convinced of a continuing apostolic ministry are outworking their beliefs. The focus is on some of those associated with the Restoration Movement, together with others representing the wider so-called ‘New Apostolic Reformation’. This part of the thesis considers the grounds and process of apostolic recognition, the exercise of apostolic authority, the development of apostolic spheres or ‘networks’, the apostolic approach to the major tasks of the church, and the response of the new models to the pressing issues of apostolic ‘succession’.

The overall concern of the thesis is to investigate the nature of biblically authentic apostleship: What is an apostle? What does he do? Are the biblical patterns relevant for today? Are contemporary expressions authentic If apostolic ministry is essential in enabling the Church to come to unity and maturity before the return of Christ (Ephesians 4:11-13), then it’s vital that we arrive at a truly biblical view of these things…

The THESIS is available to download using the link below. SUMMARY sections can be found at pages 48-50, 75-76 and 107-108, with overall CONCLUSIONS at pages 110-112.

Why Mission Matters!

Why Mission Matters!

Our ideas about participating in ‘mission’ are many and varied! To some, it seems daunting and way beyond the comfort zone! To others, mission is what happens overseas, and requires a special calling if we are to get involved. To some, it’s regarded as the pastime of the super-zealous. And to other, perhaps, it is still seen as a special department of the church – an alternative to ‘prayer’ or ‘bible study’!…

But, as you’d expect, the Bible gives us an altogether different perspective! In the pages of the New Testament we find ‘mission’ is part of the normal day-to-day life of the church – requiring neither a special calling nor a special bravery. Here, mission is what inevitably happens when followers of Jesus live their lives with compassion and generosity towards those around them.

And it seems to me that the early church were absolutely convinced of a few things that fundamentally shaped this perspective; this straightforward view of mission and how they participated in it. Let me suggest four such convictions they had, that God wants us to be equally convinced about:

Firstly, let’s be convinced that our mission is nothing less than the outworking of God’s eternal purpose! The very first page of the Bible announces that God’s plan is to fill the earth with people in His image; God’s original commission to Adam and Eve was to be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth (Genesis 1:28). Thereafter, all the covenants included an ‘expansionary’ dimension: Noah, like Adam, was to be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth (Genesis 9:1); Abraham was promised descendants too numerous to count (Genesis 15:5); Moses received a covenant designed to keep God’s people holy and healthy as they expanded in the promised land (Exodus 20ff); and the covenant with David involved an everlasting, ever-growing Kingdom (2 Samuel 7). It’s no wonder, therefore, that when Jesus gave His followers what we now call the ‘great commission’ – telling us to “go into all world and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19f) – He was effectively re-stating the original commission and re-emphasising God’s eternal purpose and desire! God wants His People everywhere, so His Kingdom comes and His glory covers earth as waters cover sea!…

Secondly, let’s be assured that our mission is nothing less than continuing all that Jesus started!  As Luke tells us, the four Gospels are a record of “all that Jesus began to do and to teach” (Acts 1:1), and the start of the ‘second phase’ of His ministry is described in the Book of Acts – where we see His Church continuing all He’d started: proclaiming the Good News of Kingdom and proving He’s King by setting people free and establishing churches in every place!…

Linked with this, thirdly, let’s understand that our mission is nothing less than the very reason Jesus sent His Spirit!  He told His disciples to wait until they’d received the power that He’d promised (Luke 24:49) and that the baptism with the Holy Spirit would empower them to “be His witnesses” in the locality, in the region, and to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). To put it another way, the baptism in the Spirit was the ‘ultimate act’ of Christ’s first coming: it wasn’t enough to have a forgiven people; He needed a Church empowered by His Spirit so they could continue His works!  He lived, died, rose, and ascended….so that He could send His Spirit!  It was all part of the eternal plan: He ascended with His physical body but left a spiritual Body behind – His Church, now filled with His Spirit.  And all this means that the baptism and empowering of the Spirit is for our mission and not just for our meetings!… 

And then lastly, let’s appreciate that our mission is nothing less than the key to Christ’s return! Jesus told us He will come again and He told us exactly when it will happen (and, therefore, when “the end will come”). So there’s no need for speculation! The return of Christ will take place when (and only when) “this good news of the kingdom” has been “proclaimed in all the world as a testimony to all nations” (Matthew 24:14).  The early church were convinced of this! And so their zeal and devotion to spreading the Good News everywhere was deeply rooted in a belief that fulfilling the great commission of their Lord was the most significant thing they could do with their lives…

Mission really matters, and never more so than right now! And when followers of Jesus live their lives with compassion and generosity towards those around them we experience the joy and fulfilment of participating in His eternal purpose, continuing all that He started, living-out a life empowered by His Spirit and – not least – hastening His return!

Rooted: Covenant

Rooted: Covenant

Season 2 of ROOTED focuses on COVENANT – a fundamental theme that runs throughout the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation! At times the idea of covenant is up front and central, with the biblical story providing great detail of the way God makes covenants with different people at different times. Elsewhere the outworking of covenant is seemingly in the background. But whether it seems prominent or not, we can be assured that covenant really matters, all the time! The God of the Bible is a covenant-making, covenant-keeping and covenant-enabling God. It is His way with mankind.

In this new series we’ll be looking to: define biblical covenant; contrast covenant theology and dispensationalism; explore the meaning of the amazing word hesed (‘covenant-love’ and so much more); look at some of the key features of each of the major Old Testament covenants; learn lessons from the patriarchs and the kings; and understand the purpose of the Law… Then: see how Jesus fulfils the old covenants and establishes the new covenant; consider our covenantal responsibilities; explain the apostolic understanding of ‘Israel’; discover the dynamic realities of the covenant meal; see the way that marriage is only fully enjoyed and expressed in the context of covenant; and look at the vital role of covenant-love and loyalty amongst leadership teams.

Digging-deeper to study the nature and purpose of the biblical covenants will reap multiple benefits! It will give us wonderful insights into the nature and purpose of God; provide a great overview and perspective of the whole biblical story and timeline; deepen our love of Christ and His transforming work; reveal the ever-expansive, world-embracing purpose of God; and trigger many practical implications and areas of personal growth!…

The Unstoppable Mission

The Unstoppable Mission

As we’ve seen in Part 1 and Part 2 of this mini-series, Jesus is totally unchangeable – the same yesterday, today and forever – and has a Kingdom that, unlike every earthly kingdom, is totally unshakeable.  Now we will see that He has empowered His Church to spread the Good News of His Kingdom everywhere. This is our mission, and nothing can stop it!…

Let’s start by briefly making 4 vital statements (expanded elsewhere) that will put things in context and explain why the mission is unstoppable:

  1. Our mission is the outworking of God’s eternal purpose. The original commission to Adam was to be fruitful and multiply (Genesis 1:28) and God’s desire to see his people fill the earth is seen repeatedly thereafter.  Our great commission to “make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19-20) is a re-statement of this great purpose. 
  2. Our mission is continuing what Jesus started.  The Gospels record “all that Jesus began to do and teach” (Acts 1:1) and Acts shows the early church continuing all He’d started, as they proclaimed and proved He is King and has defeated every enemy.
  3. Our mission is the very reason Jesus sent His Spirit.  Acts 1:4-8 makes clear that the whole purpose of the baptism with the Holy Spirit is to empower His disciples to be His witnesses in spreading the gospel.
  4. Our mission is the key to Christ’s return. Jesus declared He will come again and “the end will come” only when the good news of Kingdom has been preached in every nation (Matthew 24:14).

Since the purpose of God will always prevail, and Jesus will finish what He started, and His return is never in doubt…we can be assured that our mission cannot be thwarted – it is unstoppable

Now, if you’re anything like me, it will also help to know: What does this look like in practice?  How will it happen? How do we move from theory to reality?  And how can we play our part?…  

The story of the healing at the Beautiful Gate (Acts 3:1-12) provides some answers to these important questions.  This story is positioned: immediately after 3,000 people are initially added to the church (Acts 2:41) and then more are added “every day” (Acts 2:47); and immediately before a further 2,000 are added (Acts 4:4) – and in fact it’s this event that triggers the second wave of growth.  And this story is here in the middle of these things by design, to tell us about “one day” that illustrates “every day”, about one man who was saved and added as an example of thousands of others, and to describe one supernatural act that was typical of the “many signs and wonders” prevalent in the church (Acts 2:43).  And, as such, it contains keys that help us become part of unstoppable mission and growth in our communities and churches.  Let’s look at 5 things we see here:

Firstly, the story shows that our mission is not our meetings!  This miracle took place as Peter and John were on their way to pray (verse 1).  God moved in power outside the meeting, because that’s where the need was!  Our mission doesn’t depend on our buildings or our meetings; we can play our part at any time in any place!  We are never ‘more spiritual’ or ‘more usable’ when we are worshipping, praying or fellowshipping with others; in fact, as far as mission goes, we’re probably much more useful when we’re not in a meeting! Meetings aren’t a substitute for mission; good doctrine isn’t an alternative to good deeds; and our great community must not distract us from our Great Commission!  If we want to turn our world upside-down we must let Him turn our church inside-out!

Secondly, we must not miss the moments. Peter and John arrive at the Gate at just same time as the lame man (verse 2); God creates ‘a moment’ when they find themselves sharing the same small patch of planet earth!  None has planned it, but Peter and John know how to make most of every opportunity; and are alert to this ‘moment’ and available for God to use them at any time in any place.  Jesus had told them to “Go and make disciples….” And promised “You will receive power…. you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem…”  And now here they are: in Jerusalem and ready to be used!  Participating in the mission means being ready for the many ‘moments’ God will bring our way.

Then, thirdly, we must look and listen.  Peter and John listened to the man’s request and then “looked at him intently” (verse 4).  If we’re going to recognise these God-given opportunities we must attune our senses to what’s happening around us: there’s always something to see and hear; every situation and conversation alerts us to a heart-cry if we look and listen carefully.  Peter and John were ‘present in the moment’, and gave this man their time and attention. Playing our part means taking time to notice and care about the need that’s all around us.

Fourthly, we must be ready to give what we’ve got.  In response to what they saw and heard, Peter simply gave the man what he had (verse 6).  He gave him Jesus, and a miraculous healing in His Name.  Simply sharing what we have, passing-on what we’ve discovered and allowing our lives to overflow is the very heart of our mission!  And note that Peter and John gave away what they enjoyed “every day” (Acts 2:42-47) to a man who’d spent his life begging “every day” (Acts 3:2) – and from then on no day was ever the same again!  It’s a great picture of a thriving church sharing the goodness of God with a barely-surviving world.  When we keep it simple and give what we’ve got…the mission is unstoppable! 

And then lastly, we must help people up and let them hold on.  Peter reached out and helped the man up (verse 7) and let him hold on as they took him into the gathered church (verse 11).   It takes great courage to lift up a lame man!  But also to share your story, offer to help, sit and listen, ask if you can pray…. But note that it was as he lifted him up that healing exploded in the man’s body!  God moves when we step-out.  This man expected nothing more than a hand-out, but Peter offered an outstretched-hand.  He was present in the moment.  It’s a reminder that Jesus embraced people, sat with them, fed them, wept with them, calmed their storms, touched and healed them.  And He’s just the same today! 

Let’s be sure nothing stops us from opening-up our lives, reaching-out and helping others in… and so playing our part in this great co-mission! In this way we can outwork God’s purpose, continue what Jesus started, enjoy His empowering and hasten His return!

(An extended video version of this message is available here)

The Unshakeable Kingdom

The Unshakeable Kingdom

In the first part of this trilogy we saw that Jesus is the Unchangeable Person – the same yesterday, today and forever!  We now explore another related truth: that this Unchangeable Person is ruling and reigning and forever extending His Unshakeable Kingdom…

The Gospels make clear that the Kingdom of God was the central message of Jesus throughout His early ministry. In Matthew’s Gospel alone, for example, there are over 50 references to the “Kingdom”: John the Baptist prepared the way by calling people to “repent, for kingdom of heaven is near” (Matthew 3:2) and Jesus began His ministry with exactly the same message (4:17), before travelling throughout the region “announcing the Good News about the Kingdom” (4:23, 9:35). His ‘Sermon on Mount’ was all about the Kingdom (Matthew 5-7); He taught to us pray that His Kingdom would come on earth as in heaven (6:10) and to seek the Kingdom above all else (6:33).  Then He sent-out the Twelve to announce that the Kingdom was at hand (10:7), told parables describing its growth (Matthew 13, 20, 22, 25) and made clear that the good news of the Kingdom must be preached in the whole world before the end will come (24:14).  And in His last forty days with His disciples, immediately prior to empowering them to be His witnesses everywhere, He spoke of nothing other than (you guessed it!) the Kingdom (Acts 1:3)!…

As we’ve posted elsewhere, God’s Kingdom comes when His will is done (Matthew 6:10) and so the ‘Kingdom of God’ is not a place but rather the sphere of His rule and reign through Jesus, who triumphed over every enemy and is now enthroned as King of kings and calls all people to come and live under His rule!…  This revolutionary message, proclaimed by the first followers of Jesus “turned the world upside down” (Acts 17:6) – but far too often the message of today’s Church is at best far less potent and at worst a different agenda altogether. It’s vital that we preach the Kingdom!  So, let’s consider four characteristics that should be part of our message: 

Firstly, the Kingdom is EVERLASTING.  Indeed, the Kingdom (God’s will outworked) has always been God’s purpose. Adam and Eve were commissioned to establish His rule and stewardship over creation.  And when God found in King David a man after His own heart, He promised: “Your house and your kingdom will continue before me for all time, and your throne will be secure forever” (2 Samuel 7:16).  David understood the eternal dimensions of this and knew his earthly kingdom was a foretaste of something much bigger, and declared “your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom. You rule throughout all generations” (Psalm 145:13).  As the prophet Isaiah foresaw, the child born to us would have the government of the world on His shoulders and would reign “from that time on and forever” (Isaiah 9:6-7).  Unlike every other dynasty, dominion or kingdom, the Kingdom of God will never end!  We needn’t be fascinated or distracted by passing trends; or by movements, people or causes that come and go – let’s seek first and live for God’s Kingdom!  And His Kingdom is not only ever-lasting it’s ever-growing. As most translations put it: “of the increase of His government and its peace there will be no end.” (Isaiah 9:7) – because the zeal of Almighty God is forever extending His Kingdom.

Secondly, Jesus repeatedly proclaimed and proved that His Kingdom is GOOD NEWS (Matthew 4:23, 9:35).  In fact, this ever-lasting, ever-growing Kingdom is the greatest news! Why? Because Jesus has defeated every enemy (Satan, sin, sickness and death) and is crowned King of kings! And by His victory He’s restored mankind, healed creation and provided for every known need. And because, unlike every failed and failing kingdom, nobody is beyond the scope or reach of Christ’s Kingdom – it’s good news for everyone, everywhere.  And the Kingdom is all the good news we need; as E. Stanley Jones put it, it is ‘God’s total answer to man’s total need’.  Everything else is peripheral; every other good cause is smaller than His Kingdom. In fact, any other ‘gospel’ leaves us needing more, But the gospel of the Kingdom – that Jesus is Lord and offers new life – is all-sufficient.  The really good news is the Kingdom, with nothing added or subtracted.  If our goal is feeding the hungry, it’s not big enough; if our goal is strengthening marriages or empowering parents these aren’t big enough!  If our goal is impacting politics, influencing our work-places or improving our neighbourhood, these are all good but they’re all too small!  Jesus summarised His mission by saying: “I must preach the good news of the Kingdom…because that is why I was sent” (Luke 4:43).  Our goal must be to see His kingdom established – and it will include all those things, but will eclipse them all as well! 

Thirdly, the Kingdom is OUR NEW HOME, the proper place of belonging of all who follow Christ!  Jesus said we “see” and “enter” the Kingdom when we’re “born again” (John 3:3,5); that’s when we begin to live in the dimension of His rule and reign over our lives: we start making decisions and choices that please Him; we begin honouring Him with our words and actions; and we begin to live for His cause… We start a new life in a new Kingdom.  It’s re-birth, a reorientation, and a relocation!  God has “rescued us from the domain of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of His Son” (Colossians 1:13).  And we’re also “added to the church” (Acts 2:41), which is the community of the King; the people amongst whom His Kingdom is made visible to a watching world. If ‘Jesus is Lord’ we will obey His instructions, mend broken relationships, shun gossip, honour God with our finances, pray before making big decisions…  And when our lives, families, homes, and careers come under the rule and reign of God, there is “righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Spirit” (Romans 14:17) – and health, order and blessing – and it will soon be obvious to others that we live under a different regime.  

And all this brings us to declare that the Kingdom of God is UNSHAKEABLE!  In Hebrews 12:27-28 we read that “all of creation will be shaken and removed, so that only unshakable things will remain” and that “we are receiving a Kingdom that is unshakable…”. As we’ve said already, every alternative to God’s Kingdom has been, is being, or will be shaken. Only His Kingdom will stand firm!  And in the midst of the many shakings of our day (in health, economics, politics and much else) we may not understand everything, but we can certainly ‘stand under’ the Throne of King Jesus. And, as citizens of His Kingdom, we can represent it in every way: we can be ever-growing, good news and unshakeable.

We’re at home in a Kingdom that’s everlasting and ever-growing and is good news for the whole world. Jesus is same yesterday, today and forever, and His Kingdom cannot be shaken – and it doesn’t get more secure than that!…

(An extended video version of this message is available here)

The Unchangeable Person

The Unchangeable Person

The opening verses of Hebrews tell us it was “through the Son” that God “created the universe” and now “sustains everything” (1:2-3); and that when all created things have perished, He will “remain forever”  (1:11), because He is “always the same” (1:12).  The final chapter of Hebrews repeat this staggering truth: “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever” (Hebrews 13:8).

The way we see and relate to Jesus will determine everything else. How do we think of Him? Pray to Him or worship Him?…  And however we answer, and whatever His many other awesome attributes, He is always the same. Theologians call it His ‘immutability’ and it’s an anchor to our faith: God (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) does not and cannot change.  He is the same, all the time.  And therefore He is completely consistent and totally trustable.  If He could change, the universe would be open to chaos and we would be lost.  But He does not and cannot!  In fact, as the apostle James tells us: “With Him there is no variation” (James 1:17). Unlike anybody else, Jesus Christ is the same, all the time – and that great truth is of the utmost significance!…

To put it another way, and to give us a helpful image of His immutability, He is The Rock!  As Jesus explained, wise people build their house on Rock (Matthew 7:24); indeed, Jesus (the wisest of all) is building His House – the Church – on Rock (Matthew 16:18).  We can build our lives and our churches on Him, because He is unchanging, unshifting, immovable; “the same yesterday, today and forever”. So, let’s dig a bit deeper to discover what He was like “yesterday”, because that’s what He’s like today and will be like tomorrow.  Let’s consider three ‘yesterdays’:

Firstly, if we go back to the very beginning, we see that the Son of God did not begin to exist in Bethlehem, two thousand years ago; that was when He took on flesh, but He had always been and He will always be!  He is eternal!  That’s why those verses in Hebrews 1 tell us that it’s through Him all of creation came into being – a truth also declared by Paul (Colossians 1:16-17) and John (John 1:3).  And Jesus calls Himself “the Originator of God’s creation” (Revelation 3:14).  God the Father, through the Son, by the Spirit created the heavens and the earth, and did so from things that didn’t exist (Romans 4:17, Hebrews 11:3).  And He’s just the same today: He creates by His Word and He sustains all He creates, and He can do new, creative and miraculous works in our lives!

Secondly, we discover that Jesus appeared on earth at various times in the Old Testament; even before His incarnation, the Son of God made Himself known to mankind.  Some of these ‘theophanies’ are more obvious than others, but consider for example: When Abraham returned from battle he met Melchizedek (Genesis 14) who is described as the “king of righteousness” and “king of peace”; one “having neither beginning of days nor end of life”, one “resembling the Son of God” (Hebrews 7:2-3)!   When Jacob wrestled “a man” who blessed him, changed his name and told him he’d prevail, he knew he’d “seen God face to face” (Genesis 32:30). When Moses led God’s people through the wilderness the Rock that brought forth water “was Christ” (1 Corinthians 10:4). When Shadrach, Meshach & Abednego are thrown into the fiery furnace for refusing to bow down to Nebuchadnezzar’s golden idol, the king sees a fourth man in the furnace with them who “looks like a son of the gods” (Daniel 3:25).  And when Isaiah “saw the Lord” enthroned in the Temple (Isaiah 6) it was none other than Jesus (John 12:41).  Here and elsewhere Jesus is present to find, meet, come alongside, intervene and provide for His people…  And just as He was yesterday, so He is today! 

And then thirdly, when He took on flesh and walked amongst us He gave the most complete manifestation of His unchangeable nature.  Having declared “before Abraham was even born, I AM” (John 8:58), He made seven powerful “I am…” statements to show us what this meant: (1) “I am the Bread of life” (John 6:35,48) – sustaining, nourishing; providing, refreshing, satisfying us. (2) “I am the Light of World” (John 8:12, 9:5) – banishing darkness, removing fear, making things plain. (3) “I am the Door of the Sheep” (John 10:7,9) – giving access to the Father; guarding, protecting, keeping us safe. (4) “I am the Good Shepherd” (John 10:11,14) – caring, leading, feeding, healing; devoted to His flock. (5) “I am the Resurrection and the Life” (John 11:25) – carrying our sin and sickness, triumphing over death, empowering us to live Spirit-filled, overcoming lives. (6) “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life” (John 14:16) – all our wisdom, the answer to every dilemma, the key to every breakthrough. And (7) “I am the True Vine” (John 15:1,5) – joining us to Himself and one another; and enabling us to be fruitful all the time…  This is JESUS – the Great I AM, the Son of God, the Christ – who is the same Yesterday, Today and Forever! 

Jesus is the same today as when He created all things, and when He appeared in the Old Testament, and when He walked on earth.  He is exactly the same this year as last year, or your best year ever!  He does not change.  He’s the same day or night, and whatever the season, and whatever we face.  He’s the same whether His church is gathered or scattered. He doesn’t change when we change; He doesn’t deviate when we go off-track.  He cannot love us any more or less!  He is always good, all the time.  He was all-sufficient for Abraham, Moses and Daniel and his friends; and for Paul and Peter and John – and He’s all-sufficient for you and me! He never changes.  Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever.  And therefore we can anchor our lives to Him, build our churches on Him, and find total security in Him!  There’s a Rock on which we can stand.  He is unchangeable, and that changes everything!….

In Part 2 we will see that this Unchangeable Person has an Unshakeable Kingdom, but before you move on why not take some time to consider what the unchangeable nature of Jesus means for you at this time?

(An extended video version of this message is available here)

Unchangeable, Unshakeable, Unstoppable!

Unchangeable, Unshakeable, Unstoppable!


“He alone is my rock and my salvation, my fortress where I will never be shaken” (Psalm 62:2, 6)

The foundations upon which we build our lives and churches are more important than we could ever imagine. The strength and success of anything depends on what it stands upon; the health of the roots will always determine the quality of the fruit. Even our attitudes and reactions, and our perspectives on things will be profoundly affected by what we hold to be true. And in times of challenge or uncertainty we need to know what we can depend and rely upon – think how often King David’s psalms express his trust in God “the Rock”.

Solid foundations become the anchor-points and reference-points in our lives – the unshifting truths we embrace and to which we will return again and again, and on which we build so much more. This mini-series of three article focuses on three great truths that are fundamental to our lives and our churches.

In the first, we consider the fact that Jesus is UNCHANGEABLE. The Bible describes Him as “the same, yesterday, today and forever” (Hebrews 13:8) and this of course has profound implications: all that He was in the past He is today, and will be forever; and all that He did before He can do again! We can rely on Him and build our lives on Him, which is exactly what He invites us to do (Matthew 7:24-27).

In the second, we see that Jesus has a Kingdom that is UNSHAKEABLE (Hebrews 12:28). The Kingdom of God is everlasting and ever-growing and is good news for everyone, everywhere (Matthew 4:23, 9:35). And, whilst so many other things are uncertain and unstable, God’s Kingdom remains utterly unshakeable – there’s no better place to be!

And then in the third article, we focus on the fact that Jesus has commissioned and empowered His Church to spread the good news of His Kingdom everywhere! This is our urgent task and mission, and it is UNSTOPPABLE until Jesus returns (Matthew 24:14). We conclude by looking at a true story (Acts 3:1-11) that helps us make this mission practical in our own cultures and contexts .

Jesus never changes, His Kingdom is never shaken, and His mission will never fail – and holding tightly onto these three great truths will keep us properly anchored and focussed. It’s my prayer that these three article and the accompanying video messages will be a great encouragement to you! Part one starts here